biodiverseed:

Hugelkultur
Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.
For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 
As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.
Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.
My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).
Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur
#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

biodiverseed:

Hugelkultur
Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.
For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 
As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.
Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.
My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).
Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur
#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

biodiverseed:

Hugelkultur
Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.
For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 
As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.
Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.
My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).
Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur
#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

biodiverseed:

Hugelkultur
Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.
For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 
As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.
Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.
My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).
Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur
#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

biodiverseed:

Hugelkultur
Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.
For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 
As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.
Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.
My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).
Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur
#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

biodiverseed:


Hugelkultur

Hugelkultur, meaning “hill culture” in German, is a method of raised bed gardening that uses decaying wood as a basis for building up a berm. Berms are useful in directing the flow of water, and protecting more delicate plants from prevailing wind damage.

For this simple hugelkultur garden, I have piled sticks and wood, covered them in compost, planted my shrubs, and mulched the resulting berm first with a layer of newspapers, and second with a layer of wood chips. 

As the wood breaks down, it will create a rich soil with plenty of air pockets, allowing for excellent drainage and root penetration for the plants planted in the mound.

Hugelkultur raised beds are a form of “no-dig” garden (like the straw bale gardens) making them a good choice for those with impaired mobility or strength. They also sequester carbon, and provide a handy use for all of the trimmings from pruning and hedge maintenance.

My yard has poor drainage, so building up the soil is the only sustainable way to utilise the space without creating a pond. Hugelkultur beds provide exceptional drainage for plants that don’t like “wet feet” (ie. waterlogged root systems).

Diagram: Permaculture UK - The Many Benefits of Hugelkultur

#garden hacks #DIY #permaculture #hugelkultur #compost #mulch

mothernaturenetwork:

50 ways to reuse your garbage
From fruit peels and coffee grounds to pantyhose and pill bottles, here’s how to save money and treat your trash like treasure.

eartheasy:

Sometimes the best paths in life are the messiest…

halftheskymovement:

When Aqwalina’s abusive husband abandoned the family, she found herself between a rock and a hard place. Financial opportunities for women were few and far between and like most Tanzanians, her livelihood depended on harvested crops from small rural farms. Aqwalina borrowed money from family and friends and invested in a manually-powered irrigation pump that soon transformed her farm from barren to lush.

By investing in pumps, women can harvest more crops year-round and generate more income by selling surplus crops. The single mother is now completely supporting her son, paying for his private school fees and even putting herself through college. 

Read more via Huffington Post

NYC to bring sheep back to Central Park Sheep Meadow

cheesenotes:

image

The Sheep Meadow in Central Park is best known now as a place to bring a book and a blanket, or throw around a frisbee, but there was a time when sheep did in fact graze there, giving the meadow its name. Although today the Park’s largest lawn features sunbathers, it was originally the home to a flock of sheep from 1864 until 1934. The sheep and shepherd were housed in a Victorian building that later became the Tavern on the Green in 1934.

Now comes word that the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation has tentatively approved a plan to convert the Sheep Meadow back into, well, a sheep meadow! Working with the Central Park Zoo, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the American Dairy Council and in collaboration with several upstate sheep dairies, the plan calls for the Sheep Meadow to be used for sheep grazing twice a day, from 5-7AM and from 4-6PM every day, starting May 1st and ending October 1st. The meadow will be closed to public use during this time to protect the sheep, and will be patrolled by a staff of apprentice shepherds working with herding dogs. In addition, a half-mile stretch of the central park loop will be closed to cars, pedestrians and cyclists for 30 minutes, twice a day, to allow for the sheep to be herded back to their barn.

Read More

manufactoriel:

 Issigi village, Burkina Faso 1991 by Stuart Franklin